Center for Security Research Articles America’s military still rules the world

America’s military still rules the world

Aleksandar Nacev PhD

Battlefields are constantly evolving, and modern warfare is quickly advancing. In turn, this is causing countries around the world to pump hundreds of billions of dollars into their militaries in the constant race to develop the most advanced training, technology and weaponry. The permanent pressure to have the best armed forces in the world is usually connected to certain geopolitical and geostrategic goals, and military force or the projection of this force is a very important factor in achieving those goals.

But head-to-head comparisons of military strength between countries are extremely hard to come by — which is what makes the Global Firepower annual rankings so noteworthy. Their 2021 Military Strength Rankings draw on more than 55 factors to assign a Power Index score to 139 countries. The ranking assesses the diversity of each country’s weapons and pays particular attention to their available manpower. Geography, logistical capacity, available natural resources, and the size of defines budgets are also considered. The top power index score is 0.0000, which is “realistically unattainable,” according to Global Firepower. The closer a country is to this number, the more powerful its military is. But who are the top five militaries in the world? Let us take a quick glance over the list and the explanation behind the rankings.

For 2021, Japan is ranked fifth. After its defeat in World War II Japan was considered down and out. However, in recent decades it has been arming up at a great rate. With its huge economy, educated population, and being a technological powerhouse, its military is greatly equipped and budgeted.

The fourth place is held by India. India is one of the largest military powers on the planet. It has the most active manpower of any country aside from China and the US, in addition to the most tanks and aircraft of any country besides the US, China, or Russia.

China’s armed forces have been ranked third out of a list of 139 countries based on their capability on land, sea and air, as well as their financial dexterity and diversity of weapon systems. The Chinese military has grown rapidly in terms of both size and capability in the past few decades. In terms of raw manpower, it is the largest military in the world. China has also made rapid strides in its military modernisation program.

The Russian armed forces are unquestionably the second strongest military power in the world. More than a decade ago, the Russian government began to modernise its military forces and recalibrate its strategic doctrines. Russia has the world’s largest tank fleet, the second largest aircraft fleet behind the US, and the third largest submarine fleet behind the US and China.

In what should not be a surprise, the US retains its top spot as the undisputed military power in the world. America’s biggest conventional military advantage is its fleet of aircraft carriers, by far the most aircraft of any country and cutting-edge technology. Despite budget and spending cuts rumours, Washington has allocated more than $740 billion to the U.S. military budget in 2021.

This article was originally published for Conservatives Global.

Related Post

Crime and its Profits from the Corona CrisisCrime and its Profits from the Corona Crisis

Tamara Mitkovska

From December until today, we are facing a disease that took the world by surprise. The pandemic caused an economic and social crisis that diverted the attention of the authorities from crime. Police and the military are being used to implement quarantine, many businesses have collapsed and many jobs have been lost. Hospitals have been, and still are, overflooded with patients for whom there is no cure, and those suffering from other diseases have remained almost neglected. This set of circumstances is ideal for the rise of criminal activity around the world.

In the overall situation we are in, we wonder where are the additional activities of the police during the pandemic? Until now, they have included enforcing curfews, as well as conducting state quarantine,compliance with the orders for self-isolation, supporting the staff from public health facilities in establishing contacts with an infected person, specific tasks and responsibilities of border police officers, and so on. It is more than clear that these additional activities carry an additional, but also a very large burden on the already stretched resources. (more…)

Strategic Trend – In Serbia, the new government is already oldStrategic Trend – In Serbia, the new government is already old

By Matteo Tacconi*

On the 24th of October, the new Serbian government was announced. Led by Ana Brnabic, confirmed as Prime Minister, it is a national alliance between the only three parties that won seats in Parliament at elections on June 21: the Serbian Progressive Party (SNS), dominating the political scene for years; the Serbian Socialist Party (SPS), its traditional ally; the Serbian Patriotic Alliance (SPAS), a right-wing, populist party that had never been in Parliament before. 

The government is made of 21 ministers plus 2 ministers without portfolio. With 11 women as ministers, it is the most gender-balanced cabinet ever in the region. But it will have a short life span. Just a few days before it was formed, the Serbian President and SNS leader Aleksandar Vucic announced that there will be snap parliamentary elections in April 2022. Vucic said it makes sense to couple regular presidential elections, scheduled on April 22, with the parliamentary vote. He also added that municipal elections in Belgrade, also planned for 2022, could be arranged for the same date.

(more…)

Returning terrorists threaten us allReturning terrorists threaten us all

Aleksandar Nacev PhD

What started in 2011 as a popular uprising against the Syrian regime escalated into an all-out war that engulfed both Syria and Iraq, drew in a suite of regional actors and world powers, and attracted an unprecedented number of volunteer combatants from more than a hundred countries.

Among those countries are many of the nations in the Western Balkans, from which more than a thousand nationals of Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, N. Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia are estimated to have travelled to the battle­fields of Syria and Iraq since 2012. The significance of this number becomes apparent when you consider the context of the combined population across these small countries, a total population of less than nineteen million. The rates of volunteer mobilisation relative to the population size of the Western Balkans nations are far higher than any other in western European afflicted by volunteer fighters and terrorists. 

(more…)